Ron, Google just had some major updates, avoid buying any type of views. Like I previous said, high pr backlinks is what you need. Best practice is using about 5 do follow web 2.0 properties to link directly to your YouTube video, and build all backlinks to your 5 web 2.0 properties so if your video gets deleted from buying views you still have all that backlink juice that you can redirect to the new video.

This is another excellent piece of content Brian. I now find myself asking, “What would Brian do?” while creating content/outreach. In this piece though, I cannot wrap my head around your video production only costing $90. Every time I have looked into video production/editing locally, the price has always been $1000+. Perhaps because I live so close to Hollywood LOL.
Ensure that the pictures on your website have file names which include the target keyword. Also, your target keyword should be part of your image’s Alt Text. This will improve optimization for your article and also create a clearer picture for the search engines to the relevancy of your article/page. Images are an important component of any website as they make pages visually attractive as well as informative. Optimizing your images should naturally boost your ranking. Also, your image will get a high rank in Google image search.
Google is still nothing but a computer software and if you ranking high in Google make sure you’re ranking high in YouTube so you getting at least 30% suggested video traffic and 25% YouTube search traffic. Google will drop your video if it’s only ranking high because of backlinks. And it’s okay to get 100-200 fake views YouTube don’t care about that, but once it’s like 5,000 views in 2hours for a topic that gets 100 searches a month all from Russia, you going down!
Google’s aim is to provide the most relevant result for any given query. Their entire business model relies on them being able to do this, consistently, across hundreds of billions of searches. For that reason, they’ve invested heavily into understanding the intent of queries, i.e., the reason a person typed a specific thing into Google in the first place.
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