It’s a simple Google Chrome extension. First, you have to install the extension in your Google Chrome browser. Once installed, it will appear as a little checkmark icon beside your address bar. When you click on it, it will immediately start scanning all the links on a particular web page. If a link is broken or dead, it will be highlighted in red, and the error will be shown right beside the text (e.g., “404”).

There is much you can do right with YouTube but there is also a lot of things you can do wrong! For instance all of my affiliate videos are on the same channel, if Google decided i violated their tos I would have to start all over but Google see the value I bring. I would suggest using different channels for different niches rather than having 1 channel or 1,000 channels.
Great article Brian – thanks! Quick question – I had kind of noticed that some search terms Google seems to not want to return videos in the results at all. If we can rank it for a longer tail keyphrase will Google then be more likely to consider ranking it for the original phrase you can’t get ranked for? For example,if I wanted to rank for Holiday Cottages in The Loire (which I wasn’t able to get a video to show up in at ALL for about the first 10 pages) – If I ranked it for How to Book Holiday Cottages in The Loire – would that help get a ranking for that first phrase I wanted to target (Holiday Cottages in The Loire)? Thanks
Hey Brian. From my experience embeds are just as important because in a way it’s a more powerful link. Most importantly home page contextual embeds on high pr related topics are key but extremely hard to get. I would say 1 of those embeds are worth 2 high pr links. Other than that Brian you’re right. Embeds are powerful because the user have to take time embed and share the video. Like for example Google search passive print system. My video is on the front page 0 backlinks. 10 pdf embeds that don’t show up in Ahrefs. Pretty stealth. But the Youtube button on each embed is a backlink that takes you back to YouTube. So if the site is relevant you technically don’t need backlinks for low competition keywordsuse my vvideo as a staple.
Brian it seems to me that one of the biggest downsides of videos on your site is the load time. So I was checking into lazy load. But then I read that Google doesn’t crawl videos if they are lazy loaded. Do you think lazy loading is a good idea? Basically what’s more important for SEO: speed, or having Google see the extra video content? Or is there another way to make videos faster?
Great post! You just gave me an idea for another passive income stream. I haven’t had any experience with building backlinks in to YouTube vids, but I think that the sheer authority of YT that the internal links alone makes it easier to rank for moderately competitive keywords compared to websites, the farthest I’d go is share it in social media. The key is getting it indexed.
Great content! I’m just wondering about the minimum length of 5 minutes. Do you have any numbers on how many people use the filter ‘short < 4 minutes' option when searching? I use it a lot myself. For me, that is a reason to keep my videos under 4 minutes where possible. Also, if you make your video longer than 5 minutes just for the sake of length, it can hurt the user experience. What are your thoughts on that?

Just to be clear. 100-200 views just to give your video that presence, (nobody wants to be the first person to watch your video) 3-5 days after you upload it in the span of 25-50 views a day until you at 100-200 views. Then just keep building quality links then everything else should be natural especially the traffic. Or what’s the point? Have a video getting 100 views per month making me $500. Keyword research should be your main concern, then rankings come easy.
It’s a simple Google Chrome extension. First, you have to install the extension in your Google Chrome browser. Once installed, it will appear as a little checkmark icon beside your address bar. When you click on it, it will immediately start scanning all the links on a particular web page. If a link is broken or dead, it will be highlighted in red, and the error will be shown right beside the text (e.g., “404”).
Google’s aim is to provide the most relevant result for any given query. Their entire business model relies on them being able to do this, consistently, across hundreds of billions of searches. For that reason, they’ve invested heavily into understanding the intent of queries, i.e., the reason a person typed a specific thing into Google in the first place.
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