Your the first person that I have found that has mentioned a “video search” in Google. This is a GREAT point that I will continue to look for and title in the right way to acquire these searches. I do mostly local SEO, and many of the terms that I want to target are not viable as “video searches” per say. I have found that combining reviews with local search terms works well, and that videos can rank about 5x faster than traditional SEO when done correctly.

Great Stuff Brian!! I have read carfeully throughout your guide and noted down a customized plan for myself to follow everytime I post youtube videos. By the end of the blog post, I saw that you had a checklist already provided haha. It is great however as I’ve written a more customizable one. You information is truly helpful and so valuable. Thanks so much for this blog post.

It appears that the reason this page from a little-known website is able to rank amongst the bigger players is that the content itself is more focussed. It talks about how to name images for SEO, whereas most of the other pages are more general guides to image SEO—which all presumably mention the importance of naming images correctly, amongst other things.
Local results are based primarily on relevance, distance, and prominence. These factors are combined to help find the best match for your search. For example, Google algorithms might decide that a business that's farther away from your location is more likely to have what you're looking for than a business that's closer, and therefore rank it higher in local results.
Keep in mind, this will often mean shifting the focus of your business from more general to more specific products or services. For instance, instead of exclusively offering general home renovation services, you could consider specializing in "one day bathroom renos" or "custom kitchen makeovers." These more specific keyword phrases will likely be much easier to rank for, which will mean you can start ranking that much faster.
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